Start drought-proofing

first_imgBy Gary L. WadeUniversity of GeorgiaIt may be time to start drought-proofing the landscape to help itsurvive times of limited rainfall and little to no irrigation.Georgians, like other Americans, have a growing thirst for water.A recent U.S. Geological Survey report noted a tenfold increasein public water use since 1950. That’s mainly due to where agrowing number of people live. More than two-thirds of thestate’s 8.4 million people live in just 24 of its 159 counties.As competition for water increases, summer restrictions or banson outdoor water use occur more often, even during years ofnormal rainfall. If you rely on municipal water to keep yourlandscape green, you’ll likely be affected at some point byrestrictions or bans on outdoor water use.Not expensiveYou don’t have to invest a lot of money, though, to make yourlandscape more drought-resistant.Just changing how you water can often help. Reducing the amountof water you give landscape plants this spring will reduce theirreliance on extra watering this summer.By weaning your plants off extra water now, you’ll encouragetheir root systems to grow deeper. The more you baby plants withwater now, the shallower their roots will grow and the more waterthey’ll demand during dry times.Consider putting in some sweeping beds of pine straw, pine barkor hardwood mulch. Many local governments collect and grind thebrush people leave at the curb and then give it back as mulch.Check with your city, town or county about these materials. Somecounties provide them free or for a small fee.Great investmentMulch is one of the best investments you can make in the summerlandscape. It traps moisture in the soil, making it available tothe plants longer. Fine-textured mulches like pine straw or pinebark do that better than coarse-textured mulches.Newspapers aren’t just for reading any more. They make excellentmulch around ornamental shrubs and flowers.Use a leaf rake to gently pull back the mulch you have now. Dipnewspaper in a bucket of water and spread it two sheets thickover the ground. Then put the mulch back to hide the newspaperand hold it in place.Newspaper not only helps hold moisture but adds organic matter tothe soil as it decomposes.When planting flowers, it’s easier to spread the moistenednewspaper before planting. Then make holes in the paper and plantthrough them.Best wateringHand watering with the garden hose and targeting plants that needwater is more efficient than watering with a lawn sprinkler,which waters some plants that don’t need it.When watering by hand, use a water breaker to apply water slowlyat a rate the soil can absorb. This may require you to makeseveral passes over an area.Put saucers under patio plants to collect excess water. As thesoil in the pot dries out, it will wick up the excess water fromthe saucer as needed.Water wicksWhen planting container plants, use strips of old T-shirts,flannel sheets or other cotton fabric as wicks, extending fromthe saucer through the drainage holes in the bottom of the potand into the soil media. The fabric acts like a wick in an oillamp. It pulls water into the soil media as needed.The wick-and-reservoir combination makes containers self-wateringduring the summer vacation, too.Wire baskets lined with coconut fiber or sphagnum moss tend todry out quickly in the summer. So line the inside with a plasticbag to reduce moisture loss through the container sides. Providedrainage holes so the pots don’t get waterlogged.To learn more about conserving landscape water, contact yourcounty University of Georgia Extension Service agent. Or visitthe “Drought in Georgia” Web site (www.georgiadrought.org).(Gary Wade is an Extension Service horticulturist with theUniversity of Georgia College of Agricultural and EnvironmentalSciences.)last_img read more

Vermont Telecommunications Authority to fund NEK fiber link

first_imgThe Vermont Telecommunications Authority (VTA) announced today its intention to fund a multi-provider fiber communications link between Newport and Hardwick.  VTA funds in the amount of $500,000 for construction of the fiber link were authorized in Act 53 of the 2011-2012 legislative session. VTA intends to ensure that the design of the proposed facility will include fiber strands which can be used for middle-mile and last-mile broadband purposes, as called for in the authorizing legislation.‘The VTA has received strong expression of community support for the expansion of fiber optic facilities in the Northeast Kingdom,’ said VTA Executive Director Christopher Campbell.  ‘This project will connect and extend existing and planned fiber networks in one of Vermont’s most rural regions.’The fiber link will be available to multiple communications service providers to serve key businesses and institutional customers, local cellular networks and for last-mile broadband expansion.In early November, the VTA received responses to an October 24, 2011 Notice of Grant Funding.  The VTA has invited all respondents to the Notice to participate cooperatively in the engineering and development of the project, and to receive strands on the project in return for partial capital contributions to the construction of the project. VTA intends to convene a process with the providers shortly to begin the design of the project. Construction of the link between two important regional centers, will provide new communications opportunities for economic development and education, while enabling new expansions of last-mile broadband and cellular services.last_img read more

Trevor Bauer claims arbitration hearing with Indians ended in ‘character assassination’

first_img MLB trade rumors: Indians ace Corey Kluber not likely to be dealt “You never know how the character assassination plays, and considering that’s what ended it,” Bauer said. “It kind of put a black mark on what I thought was a really argued case on both sides. There’s not room for that. Let’s just stick to the numbers. Let the numbers tell the story.“You don’t need to bring character assassination into it, especially for charitable campaigns.”USA Today subsequently reported that Bauer — after a meeting with Indians brass — later met again with reporters to stress once more that he’s not bitter and holds no grudge toward the team over what the Labor Relations Department said in the arbitration hearing.Trevor Bauer met with Cleveland #Indians President Chris Antonetti and GM Mike Chernoff, and then again with reporters, to say that he’s not bitter and holds no grudge towards the organization over what the Labor Relations Department said in the arbitration hearing— Bob Nightengale (@BNightengale) February 14, 2019 All-Star pitcher Trevor Bauer won his salary arbitration case with the Indians, but it doesn’t mean he was happy about what was said during the hearing. The Cleveland pitcher was awarded a $13 million contract rather than the $11 million the Indians proposed, but he claimed Thursday that the final 10 minutes of his hearing were a “character assassination” against him.  “They spent the last 10 minutes of the case trying a character assassination,” Bauer said, per USA Today. “I learned that giving to charity is a bad thing. I learned that agreeing with someone on a podcast just for the sake of argument that I was worth $10.5 million, and should be the definitive answer why I’m not worth $13 [million].“Basically, that I’m a terrible human being, which was interesting on their part. I thought that giving to charity, especially because they didn’t mention it was a charitable campaign, just mentioned the name.” Related News Bauer was referencing his “69 Days of Giving” campaign that he orchestrated last spring after winning his arbitration case.”They don’t mention that I gave to 68 charities or that I donated more than $100,000. Or that the whole point of the campaign was to bring awareness to all those charities, past the money I was giving them. Nothing about that. They just tried to say that I was bad for donating or for running that campaign.“Painfully, the arbitrator didn’t see it as a negative.”Bauer, 28, insisted he didn’t have any animosity toward Cleveland, but the right-hander said he wished they could have just stuck to “the numbers.”last_img read more