On the Blogs: Where Apple Energy Is Going Others Will Follow

first_imgOn the Blogs: Where Apple Energy Is Going Others Will Follow FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Tim Healy for Forbes.com:Apple has quietly dropped a bombshell in the energy industry, launching an entirely new subsidiary called Apple Energy that will manage the complexities of its renewable energy efforts.The only information available on Apple Energy is in the company’s filings with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, but what can be gleaned from that illustrates a foundational shift underway in the energy world.Essentially, Apple is seeking the ability to sell the renewable energy it generates to other businesses and consumers at retail prices. Without FERC’s approval, Apple will only be able to sell its energy to energy providers and utilities at wholesale prices. Apple Energy would more or less act as an energy provider itself, enabling the company to leverage its investments in renewable energy like wind and solar to generate new revenue from an entirely new market.Apple’s decision to go this route might be unique, but a close look at the path it took to get here reveals a broader shift in the way businesses think about energy. And whether you’re a bleeding-edge company with substantial financial resources like Apple, or a smaller-scale enterprise that’s just starting to dip your toes in the water, there are a few lessons to learn from Apple’s energy evolution.Apple was one of the early names to sign onto RE100, a group of the world’s biggest companies committed to 100% renewable power. In its 2016 Environmental Responsibility Report, Apple said it’s already well on its way, claiming 93% of its worldwide energy usage comes from renewables. Like most big companies that have made aggressive public commitments to renewables in the past decade, Apple has pursued these goals through a combination of strategies, including the purchase of renewable energy certificates (RECs).If a company is drawing any power from the grid, the original source of power is indistinguishable, a mix of coal, natural gas, nuclear, or renewable. By purchasing RECs, businesses essentially pay a premium to ensure that for every megawatt of energy they consume from the grid, the energy supplier is procuring at least the equivalent amount from renewable resources.While RECs have become an increasingly popular way for companies to hit their renewable targets, some have claimed businesses that use them are misleading consumers. Critics argue that a company cannot claim to be 100% renewable while relying entirely on grid power.But Apple critics—and critics of RECs at large—are missing a few key points: 1) RECs are more than an expensive way of buying positive PR—they play an important role in the economics of renewable energy development, which accelerates the integration of these resources into our nation’s resource mix; and 2) Apple’s claims are based on more than just purchasing RECs as financial instruments on the open market. Like other firms in the RE100, Apple has influenced the transformation of the electricity grid by agreeing to purchase renewable energy on a large scale.Full post: Why Apple Energy Is A Wake-Up Call For Businesseslast_img read more

Lacrosse finds win streak midway through season

first_imgSophomore midfielder Sophia Donovan shoots against Jacksonville Feb. 24. (Michelle Mankoff/Daily Trojan) Donovan recorded her third hat trick of the season against Colorado and picked up an assist to go with two ground balls and a caused turnover, earning her Pac-12 Player of the Week honors. USC’s 6-goal winning margin matches the largest in the series’ history with the Buffaloes, who entered the match on a two-game winning streak with a pair of Pac-12 road victories over Stanford and Cal. The Trojans last faced the Buffaloes in 2017 at McAlister Field, a match they won 11-5. “I think the biggest thing we’ve done throughout the season is keeping a good morale,” Concialdi said. “We’ve developed such a good team culture and it makes the long hours worth it.” The Trojans faced Virginia Tech over spring break and came out on top, 13-11. The teams traded goals for much of the first half, but USC established a lead and picked up momentum going into halftime by scoring 3 goals in the final four minutes of the half. This outburst came after a nearly eight minute-long scoring drought. USC’s five-game winning streak is the longest of the season and the longest since it had 12 consecutive wins in the 2017 season. Although the team seems to be hitting a stride, its players always see room for improvement. The Women of Troy opened the game strong, with a 4-0 run on goals by senior attacker Emily Concialdi, who returned after a two-game absence. Concialdi dished out three assists to go with 1 goal, two ground balls and a caused turnover, making her the key player in the Trojans’ win. After halftime, the Trojans didn’t look back. Sophomore attacker Sophia Donovan scored the first 2 goals of the second half to put USC up 9-5. USC didn’t slow down, and Virginia Tech could not close the scoring gap. The two victories over top-ranked teams helped the Trojans jump the ranks from No. 22 to No. 13 this week. USC holds a four-game win streak, improving to 8-1 for a Pac-12 best. Donovan led the team with 4 goals and one assist against the Hokies. She is currently the leading scorer for the Trojans, already matching her season-high record of 20 goals from last season — a feat she attributes to the entire team. Sophomore goalie Riley Hertfod racked up two saves against Oregon to lead the Trojan defense.center_img Concialdi added 2 goals for the Trojans before the match was minutes away from giving USC its fifth win. But USC took its foot off the gas and held the Ducks to 3 goals before the final horn for a 14-5 final score. No. 13 USC lacrosse capped off a dominant week of competition with a win over Pac-12 rival Oregon, marking the third victory of the week for the Trojans, who also beat No. 23 Virginia Tech and No. 24 Colorado. Donovan is shooting markedly better than USC’s team average of .422 at .556, demonstrating her individual value to the team. The Trojans finished their Pac-12 road trip with a win against the Ducks that not only extended USC’s season-long five-game winning streak with a 14-5 victory over Oregon, but also avenged an 18-11 loss to the Ducks suffered in Eugene last spring. “Making plays and scoring goals is never a one-person process, and I consider myself lucky to be a part of this offense,” Donovan said. “We have focused since August on building an offense that plays to our strengths,” Donovan said. “One of our main focuses has been making simple plays and working to make each other look good on the field.” With the Trojans strong, the team scored 5 unanswered goals throughout the first eight minutes of the game. But the Ducks answered by putting a stop to the run with a goal from sophomore attacker Lillian Stump. Following their matchup against the Hokies, USC won their fourth consecutive contest in a decisive 11-5 victory over No. 23 Colorado Buffaloes at Kittredge Field March 16. Despite a minor setback due to possible inclement weather conditions in the area, the Trojans improved to 6-2 all-time against Colorado. “Each and every day at practice is a chance to improve, and I think collectively, we have bought into that mindset,” Donovan said. “As long as we keep playing simple together there’s no limit to what we could accomplish this season.”last_img read more