Vermont unemployment rate unchanged in July at 6.0 percent

first_imgESTIMATED NONFARM EMPLOYMENT IN VERMONT(Not Seasonally Adjusted) Statewide Total – All Industries estimate is seasonally adjusted independently.Note: Beginning January 2009 Vermont is publishing a seasonally adjusted Total-All Industries estimate for theBurlington – S. Burlington MSA.Current Employment Statistics Program (CES). Produced by the Vermont Department of Labor in cooperation with the U.S Bureau of Labor Statistics. PrelimRevisedRevisedChanges From:% Changes From:INDUSTRY BY NAICSJul-10Jun-10Jul-09Jun-10Jul-09Jun-10Jul-09 July2010June2010July2009June2010July2009 Changes From The Vermont Department of Labor announced today the seasonally adjusted unemployment rate for July 2010 was unchanged from the previous month’s report holding steady at 6.0 percent. Compared to a year ago, the July unemployment rate is lower by 1.1 percent. Compared to the US rate, Vermont is 3.5 points lower than the national average.‘Based on the preliminary data, the Vermont unemployment rate remained unchanged in the month of July as did the national unemployment rate,’ said Valerie Rickert, Acting Commissioner of the Vermont Department of Labor.  ‘The reported dip in employment from last month is related to seasonal influences and was anticipated. The overall trend of the Vermont economy remains stable. Compared to a year ago, there are 4,100 fewer Vermonters reporting being unemployed.’ Analysis of Job Changes by IndustryThe preliminary ‘Not Seasonally Adjusted’ jobs numbers for July show a decline of -7,650 jobs when compared to the revised June numbers. While Total Private reports an increase of 2,200 jobs, the decline in Local Government Education of -9,950 offsets reported gains in the private industry. This decline in Local Government Education is typical for July and we anticipate a reversal of course in the September data when public schools are back in session. In July, Manufacturing reported a small pullback of -150 jobs as did Health Care and Social Assistance with an over the month decline of -400. The increase in unadjusted employment in the Private Sector was predominately comprised of an increase of +1,050 in Accommodations & Food Services, +850 jobs in Construction, +650 jobs in Colleges, Universities & Professional, and +350 jobs in Professional, Scientific, and Technical.The annual rate of unadjusted job growth was -0.6%, which is unchanged from the revised June estimate.Considering the seasonally adjusted data, the total job loss (-800) in July was broad-based with 500 jobs lost in Private Industries and 300 jobs lost in Total Government. While many industries’ over the month change was flat, three sectors led the overall decline in the seasonally adjusted statistics: Health Care & Social Assistance (-600), Accommodation & Food Services (-200 on the heels of a greater than expected increase last month), and though not published, Federal Government likely had an approximate decline of 900 jobs due predominately to the scale back of intermittent Federal Census workers. For industries with seasonally adjusted job gains, Construction led all private industries with an increase of 600 jobs. Professional, Scientific and Technical Services also had a strong month with an increase of 400 jobs.State of Vermont OverviewVermont’s July seasonally adjusted unemployment rate remained the same at 6.0 percent as a result of a relatively greater decline in the number of unemployed versus the reported declines in the labor force and the number employed. For comparison purposes, the US seasonally adjusted unemployment rate for July was 9.5 percent, also unchanged from June.July unemployment rates for Vermont’s 17 labor market areas ranged from 3.9 percent in Hartford to 7.7 percent in Newport. Local labor market area unemployment rates are not seasonally adjusted. For comparison, the July unadjusted unemployment rate for Vermont was 5.7 percent, which was three tenths of a percentage point lower than the revised June data and down a full percent from a year ago.Source: Vermont Department of Labor. 8.20.2010Vermont Labor Force Statistics (Seasonally Adjusted) Note: Unemployment rate is calculated as the number of unemployed divided by total labor force and expressed as a percent.Source: Vermont Department of Labor LAUS program in cooperation with the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics TotalNumberNumberJuly-10June-10July-09AreaLabor ForceEmployedUnemployedRate (%)Rate (%)Rate (%) Barre-Montpelier29,65027,9501,7005.75.66.6Bennington13,00012,1508506.76.68.2Bradford5,0004,6503506.76.77.1Brattleboro24,85023,4001,4505.86.26.8Burlington-South Burlington114,800109,0505,8005.05.26.1Hartford20,85020,0508003.94.14.2Manchester12,25011,5507506.06.96.8Middlebury18,20017,1501,0505.86.06.5Morristown-Stowe20,80019,5501,2506.06.46.8Newport14,00012,9501,1007.77.98.8Randolph8,6508,1006006.77.07.7Rutland27,70025,8001,9507.07.68.5Springfield12,05011,2008507.27.58.0St. Johnsbury14,85013,9509006.16.37.9Swanton-Enosburg14,20013,3508506.06.07.3Warren-Waitsfield4,1503,9502004.55.15.6Woodstock3,8503,6501504.54.94.8Vermont Total361,300340,60020,7005.76.06.7 TOTAL NONFARM287,800295,450289,650-7,650-1,850-2.6%-0.6%TOTAL PRIVATE242,750240,550244,7502,200-2,0000.9%-0.8%GOODS PRODUCING44,90044,15046,800750-1,9001.7%-4.1%MANUFACTURING30,50030,65030,750-150-250-0.5%-0.8%Durable Goods21,60021,70021,750-100-150-0.5%-0.7%Computer & Electrical Equipment Mfg.7,3007,4007,750-100-450-1.4%-5.8%Fabricated Metal Products Mfg.2,4502,4502,30001500.0%6.5%Non-Durable Goods8,9008,9509,000-50-100-0.6%-1.1%Food Mfg.4,1004,0503,950501501.2%3.8%CONSTRUCTION13,55012,70015,200850-1,6506.7%-10.9%MINING & LOGGING8508008505006.3%0.0%SERVICE-PROVIDING242,900251,300242,850-8,40050-3.3%0.0%TRADE, TRANSPORTATION AND UTILITIES55,10055,20055,950-100-850-0.2%-1.5%Wholesale Trade10,10010,0509,750503500.5%3.6%Retail Trade36,95036,75038,250200-1,3000.5%-3.4%Food & Beverage Stores10,20010,20010,10001000.0%1.0%General Merchandise Store2,9502,9002,800501501.7%5.4%Transportation, Warehousing and Utilities8,0508,4007,950-350100-4.2%1.3%Utilities1,7501,7501,750000.0%0.0%Transportation & Warehousing6,3006,6506,200-350100-5.3%1.6%INFORMATION5,2005,2505,400-50-200-1.0%-3.7%FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES12,70012,65012,600501000.4%0.8%Finance & Insurance9,6009,6009,40002000.0%2.1%Real Estate, Rental & Leasing3,1003,0503,20050-1001.6%-3.1%PROFESSIONAL AND BUSINESS SERVICES22,65022,20022,600450502.0%0.2%Professional, Scientific and Technical13,20012,85013,20035002.7%0.0%Administrative, Support and Waste9,1009,0508,950501500.6%1.7%EDUCATIONAL AND HEALTH SERVICES59,75060,10059,600-350150-0.6%0.3%Educational Services12,15012,10012,45050-3000.4%-2.4%College, Universities and Professional7,4006,7506,9506504509.6%6.5%Health Care and Social Assistance47,60048,00047,150-400450-0.8%1.0%Ambulatory Health Care Services15,90016,05015,950-150-50-0.9%-0.3%Hospitals13,00012,95012,500505000.4%4.0%Nursing and Residential Care Facilities6,9006,9506,950-50-50-0.7%-0.7%LEISURE AND HOSPITALITY32,50031,15032,1501,3503504.3%1.1%Arts, Entertainment and Recreation4,5504,2504,600300-507.1%-1.1%Accommodation and Food Services27,95026,90027,5501,0504003.9%1.5%Accommodations9,6508,7009,700950-5010.9%-0.5%Hotels & Motels8,9008,2008,0507008508.5%10.6%Food Services and Drinking Places18,30018,20017,8501004500.5%2.5%OTHER SERVICES9,9509,8509,6501003001.0%3.1%GOVERNMENT45,05054,90044,900-9,850150-17.9%0.3%Federal Government6,7507,5506,450-800300-10.6%4.7%State Government Education6,2006,4006,200-2000-3.1%0.0%Local Government Education14,50024,45014,250-9,950250-40.7%1.8%Other State Government9,8509,00010,250850-4009.4%-3.9%Other Local Government7,7507,5007,75025003.3%0.0%Note: CES PROGRAM DATA ARE PRDUCED IN COOPERATION WITH THE U.S. BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICSESTIMATES ARE PRELIMINARY AND SUBJECT TO REVISION. SEE ANNUAL SUMMARY FOR DETAILS Total Labor Force356,700358,800359,300-2,100-2,600Employment335,500337,200333,900-1,7001,600Unemployment21,30021,60025,400-300-4,100Rate (%)6.06.07.10.0-1.1Vermont’s labor force, employment and unemployment statistics are produced from a combination of a Statewide survey of households and statistical modeling. The data are produced by the Local Area Unemployment Statistics Program (LAUS) a cooperative program with the US Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics and the Vermont Department of Labor.VERMONT LABOR FORCE AND UNEMPLOYMENTLABOR MARKET AREAS BY RESIDENCE (Not Seasonally Adjusted)July 2010 Estimateslast_img read more

Credit unions: The choice of a new generation

first_imgSo, what’s all the hubbub about credit unions? Well, they’re pretty cool. They offer virtually all the same stuff a bank will, plus an additional smile when you enter your local branch. So, what really sets them apart?The first thing to consider is how they handle people with less than stellar credit who are applying for loans. A credit union will look at your credit score, yes. They will even look at who you owe money to and see if you’re making your payments when required. But just because you have a lower score, they won’t automatically say no. Credit unions are not-for-profit institutions, which means they have a tax-exempt status, making them less concerned about bringing in coinage. This means they have more leeway with who they give loans to, e.g., those who are considered riskier borrowers.The second thing is their lower fees. You can typically qualify for free checking just by having direct deposit orenrolling in e-statements. Other fees, on average, are also lower than those charged by banks.The third thing are the low rates. It was noted earlier that credit unions are not-for-profit entities. This differs from the for-profit structure of a bank. Be it a mortgage, car loan, or credit card, credit unions typically offer better rates than banks. Why?An article from The Nest puts it this way; “Unlike banks, credit unions are structured as member-owned cooperatives or non-profit corporations. This means they reinvest all of their funds back into their consumer programs and they’re exempt from state and local taxes. When you consider that the federal tax rate for corporations is 21 percent, it’s not hard to understand how credit unions can charge lower rates.”Credit unions can work with less than perfect credit and offer lower fees and rates than banks. A final benefit is the behavior of the staff. The people working at credit unions actually seem like they care about getting you the best possible deal. Why? Because they actually do. 131SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Derek San Filippo Derek is a freelance writer who spends his off time either working with his rescue animals or writing children’s books. He lives in San Diego with his beautiful wife … Web: www.financialfeed.com Detailslast_img read more

Former Syracuse forward Matthew Moyer looks back on Syracuse, ahead at Vanderbilt

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ On Nov. 15, Vanderbilt head coach Bryce Drew called Matthew Moyer into his office. “You’re suiting up,” Drew said. Moyer had transferred from Syracuse after playing one season, and he expected to sit out this season due to NCAA transfer rules. But two games into the season, Drew told him the NCAA had granted him a waiver to play for the Commodores right away. The former SU forward was stunned.“I was cleared out of nowhere, man,” Moyer said. “I had no idea what was going to happen. It was emotional. I haven’t had the easiest college career, not the most pleasant beginning.”In his lone season at Syracuse, Moyer averaged 3.2 points and 3.4 rebounds per game. After he announced his decision to transfer on March. 26, 2018, his mother, Annette, said her phone was “ringing off the hook,” with high-major Division I programs interested in offering Moyer a scholarship. The schools included Florida, Ohio State, Kansas State, Texas and Vanderbilt. He chose the Commodores, which he felt gave him a quality education and more playing time as he hoped to complete his MBA and ascend into an NBA hopeful.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textColumn ChartInfogramMoyer didn’t get the playing time he had planned at SU and that drove him to find a new program. He said his offense was limited to inside the arch. “We play man (at Vandy), and they want me to take outside shots,” Moyer said. “At Syracuse, I wasn’t really allowed to take outside shots.” He averaged 16.8 minutes per game for SU. He didn’t want to leave the S.I. Newhouse School of Communications, but he’ll continue studying communications and business at Vanderbilt.Moyer didn’t visit campus before committing. He trusted Drew after an in-home visit and a handful of phone calls. He was confident he’d made the right choice.“I wasn’t chilling in the offseason, but I wasn’t expected to play this year,” Moyer said. “Then it hit me. This is a completely different system.”He said he’ll miss playing for a Hall of Fame coach, Jim Boeheim, and for assistant coach Gerry McNamara — the man who “found me in Ohio” and knocked on Moyer’s door. Moyer said he misses his former teammates, some of whom he still plays video games with. He grew closest with junior shooting guard Tyus Battle, his old roommate. “Tyus Battle is one of my best friends,” Moyer said. “I got to be around some great players. Coach Boeheim and coach Red (Adrian Autry) and G-Mac are legends.”Alexandra Moreo | Senior Staff PhotographerBut Moyer struggled playing for SU. He redshirted his first year. Last season, as a redshirt freshman, the 6-foot-8 forward started the first 20 games, but lost his job when he suffered a high-ankle sprain in a Jan. 24 win against Boston College. Marek Dolezaj began to play well and took the starting forward position. Moyer did not start again in his SU career and played sparingly the rest of the season, oftentimes getting chastised by Boeheim from the sidelines. Following Syracuse’s Sweet 16 run that ended in Omaha, Nebraska, Moyer met with Boeheim, who, according to Moyer, told the former four-star recruit: “Do whatever’s best for you.” Now, Moyer’s focused on starting anew. He lives by himself in a dorm on campus. He’s learning to play man-to-man for the first time in three years while developing his outside shot. Through 17 games, he’s averaging 15.8 minutes per game — on par with his average at Syracuse — 4.6 points and 3.2 rebounds per contest for the Commodores, who are 9-10 overall and 0-6 in the Southeastern Conference. When Moyer reflected on his two years in central New York, he thought about fulfilling his dream of playing for SU. He thought about Battle. He said he doesn’t miss the snow, and he leaves a singular message for Syracuse and its fanbase“I’ll always be an Orangeman,” Moyer said. “It was a blessed time. I got to play for the program I wanted to play for in high school. It was a dream come true.” Published on January 28, 2019 at 10:31 pm Contact Matthew: mguti100@syr.edu | @MatthewGut21center_img Commentslast_img read more

Premier League leaders continue European dream

first_imgMauricio Pochetinno’s men are looking for their first win in Group E – after the defeat to Monaco at Wembley. The Premier League winners face Porto.Claudio Ranieri’s side are in a good position in Group G following their 3-0 away win over Club Brugge in the opening game.Elsewhere, Tottenham make the long trip to Russia for their clash with CSKA Moscow. There are also three games in the Airtricity League Premier Division.Second-placed Cork City will resume their pursuit of league leaders Dundalk.The Leesiders host Galway United at Turner’s Cross.Meanwhile, Derry City host Shamrock Rovers at the Brandywell Stadium and Sligo Rovers visit St. Pat’s.last_img read more