Vermont unemployment rate unchanged in July at 6.0 percent

first_imgESTIMATED NONFARM EMPLOYMENT IN VERMONT(Not Seasonally Adjusted) Statewide Total – All Industries estimate is seasonally adjusted independently.Note: Beginning January 2009 Vermont is publishing a seasonally adjusted Total-All Industries estimate for theBurlington – S. Burlington MSA.Current Employment Statistics Program (CES). Produced by the Vermont Department of Labor in cooperation with the U.S Bureau of Labor Statistics. PrelimRevisedRevisedChanges From:% Changes From:INDUSTRY BY NAICSJul-10Jun-10Jul-09Jun-10Jul-09Jun-10Jul-09 July2010June2010July2009June2010July2009 Changes From The Vermont Department of Labor announced today the seasonally adjusted unemployment rate for July 2010 was unchanged from the previous month’s report holding steady at 6.0 percent. Compared to a year ago, the July unemployment rate is lower by 1.1 percent. Compared to the US rate, Vermont is 3.5 points lower than the national average.‘Based on the preliminary data, the Vermont unemployment rate remained unchanged in the month of July as did the national unemployment rate,’ said Valerie Rickert, Acting Commissioner of the Vermont Department of Labor.  ‘The reported dip in employment from last month is related to seasonal influences and was anticipated. The overall trend of the Vermont economy remains stable. Compared to a year ago, there are 4,100 fewer Vermonters reporting being unemployed.’ Analysis of Job Changes by IndustryThe preliminary ‘Not Seasonally Adjusted’ jobs numbers for July show a decline of -7,650 jobs when compared to the revised June numbers. While Total Private reports an increase of 2,200 jobs, the decline in Local Government Education of -9,950 offsets reported gains in the private industry. This decline in Local Government Education is typical for July and we anticipate a reversal of course in the September data when public schools are back in session. In July, Manufacturing reported a small pullback of -150 jobs as did Health Care and Social Assistance with an over the month decline of -400. The increase in unadjusted employment in the Private Sector was predominately comprised of an increase of +1,050 in Accommodations & Food Services, +850 jobs in Construction, +650 jobs in Colleges, Universities & Professional, and +350 jobs in Professional, Scientific, and Technical.The annual rate of unadjusted job growth was -0.6%, which is unchanged from the revised June estimate.Considering the seasonally adjusted data, the total job loss (-800) in July was broad-based with 500 jobs lost in Private Industries and 300 jobs lost in Total Government. While many industries’ over the month change was flat, three sectors led the overall decline in the seasonally adjusted statistics: Health Care & Social Assistance (-600), Accommodation & Food Services (-200 on the heels of a greater than expected increase last month), and though not published, Federal Government likely had an approximate decline of 900 jobs due predominately to the scale back of intermittent Federal Census workers. For industries with seasonally adjusted job gains, Construction led all private industries with an increase of 600 jobs. Professional, Scientific and Technical Services also had a strong month with an increase of 400 jobs.State of Vermont OverviewVermont’s July seasonally adjusted unemployment rate remained the same at 6.0 percent as a result of a relatively greater decline in the number of unemployed versus the reported declines in the labor force and the number employed. For comparison purposes, the US seasonally adjusted unemployment rate for July was 9.5 percent, also unchanged from June.July unemployment rates for Vermont’s 17 labor market areas ranged from 3.9 percent in Hartford to 7.7 percent in Newport. Local labor market area unemployment rates are not seasonally adjusted. For comparison, the July unadjusted unemployment rate for Vermont was 5.7 percent, which was three tenths of a percentage point lower than the revised June data and down a full percent from a year ago.Source: Vermont Department of Labor. 8.20.2010Vermont Labor Force Statistics (Seasonally Adjusted) Note: Unemployment rate is calculated as the number of unemployed divided by total labor force and expressed as a percent.Source: Vermont Department of Labor LAUS program in cooperation with the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics TotalNumberNumberJuly-10June-10July-09AreaLabor ForceEmployedUnemployedRate (%)Rate (%)Rate (%) Barre-Montpelier29,65027,9501,7005.75.66.6Bennington13,00012,1508506.76.68.2Bradford5,0004,6503506.76.77.1Brattleboro24,85023,4001,4505.86.26.8Burlington-South Burlington114,800109,0505,8005.05.26.1Hartford20,85020,0508003.94.14.2Manchester12,25011,5507506.06.96.8Middlebury18,20017,1501,0505.86.06.5Morristown-Stowe20,80019,5501,2506.06.46.8Newport14,00012,9501,1007.77.98.8Randolph8,6508,1006006.77.07.7Rutland27,70025,8001,9507.07.68.5Springfield12,05011,2008507.27.58.0St. Johnsbury14,85013,9509006.16.37.9Swanton-Enosburg14,20013,3508506.06.07.3Warren-Waitsfield4,1503,9502004.55.15.6Woodstock3,8503,6501504.54.94.8Vermont Total361,300340,60020,7005.76.06.7 TOTAL NONFARM287,800295,450289,650-7,650-1,850-2.6%-0.6%TOTAL PRIVATE242,750240,550244,7502,200-2,0000.9%-0.8%GOODS PRODUCING44,90044,15046,800750-1,9001.7%-4.1%MANUFACTURING30,50030,65030,750-150-250-0.5%-0.8%Durable Goods21,60021,70021,750-100-150-0.5%-0.7%Computer & Electrical Equipment Mfg.7,3007,4007,750-100-450-1.4%-5.8%Fabricated Metal Products Mfg.2,4502,4502,30001500.0%6.5%Non-Durable Goods8,9008,9509,000-50-100-0.6%-1.1%Food Mfg.4,1004,0503,950501501.2%3.8%CONSTRUCTION13,55012,70015,200850-1,6506.7%-10.9%MINING & LOGGING8508008505006.3%0.0%SERVICE-PROVIDING242,900251,300242,850-8,40050-3.3%0.0%TRADE, TRANSPORTATION AND UTILITIES55,10055,20055,950-100-850-0.2%-1.5%Wholesale Trade10,10010,0509,750503500.5%3.6%Retail Trade36,95036,75038,250200-1,3000.5%-3.4%Food & Beverage Stores10,20010,20010,10001000.0%1.0%General Merchandise Store2,9502,9002,800501501.7%5.4%Transportation, Warehousing and Utilities8,0508,4007,950-350100-4.2%1.3%Utilities1,7501,7501,750000.0%0.0%Transportation & Warehousing6,3006,6506,200-350100-5.3%1.6%INFORMATION5,2005,2505,400-50-200-1.0%-3.7%FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES12,70012,65012,600501000.4%0.8%Finance & Insurance9,6009,6009,40002000.0%2.1%Real Estate, Rental & Leasing3,1003,0503,20050-1001.6%-3.1%PROFESSIONAL AND BUSINESS SERVICES22,65022,20022,600450502.0%0.2%Professional, Scientific and Technical13,20012,85013,20035002.7%0.0%Administrative, Support and Waste9,1009,0508,950501500.6%1.7%EDUCATIONAL AND HEALTH SERVICES59,75060,10059,600-350150-0.6%0.3%Educational Services12,15012,10012,45050-3000.4%-2.4%College, Universities and Professional7,4006,7506,9506504509.6%6.5%Health Care and Social Assistance47,60048,00047,150-400450-0.8%1.0%Ambulatory Health Care Services15,90016,05015,950-150-50-0.9%-0.3%Hospitals13,00012,95012,500505000.4%4.0%Nursing and Residential Care Facilities6,9006,9506,950-50-50-0.7%-0.7%LEISURE AND HOSPITALITY32,50031,15032,1501,3503504.3%1.1%Arts, Entertainment and Recreation4,5504,2504,600300-507.1%-1.1%Accommodation and Food Services27,95026,90027,5501,0504003.9%1.5%Accommodations9,6508,7009,700950-5010.9%-0.5%Hotels & Motels8,9008,2008,0507008508.5%10.6%Food Services and Drinking Places18,30018,20017,8501004500.5%2.5%OTHER SERVICES9,9509,8509,6501003001.0%3.1%GOVERNMENT45,05054,90044,900-9,850150-17.9%0.3%Federal Government6,7507,5506,450-800300-10.6%4.7%State Government Education6,2006,4006,200-2000-3.1%0.0%Local Government Education14,50024,45014,250-9,950250-40.7%1.8%Other State Government9,8509,00010,250850-4009.4%-3.9%Other Local Government7,7507,5007,75025003.3%0.0%Note: CES PROGRAM DATA ARE PRDUCED IN COOPERATION WITH THE U.S. BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICSESTIMATES ARE PRELIMINARY AND SUBJECT TO REVISION. SEE ANNUAL SUMMARY FOR DETAILS Total Labor Force356,700358,800359,300-2,100-2,600Employment335,500337,200333,900-1,7001,600Unemployment21,30021,60025,400-300-4,100Rate (%)6.06.07.10.0-1.1Vermont’s labor force, employment and unemployment statistics are produced from a combination of a Statewide survey of households and statistical modeling. The data are produced by the Local Area Unemployment Statistics Program (LAUS) a cooperative program with the US Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics and the Vermont Department of Labor.VERMONT LABOR FORCE AND UNEMPLOYMENTLABOR MARKET AREAS BY RESIDENCE (Not Seasonally Adjusted)July 2010 Estimateslast_img read more

Animal impressions and fashion shows: How SU’s “weirdness” leads to team chemistry

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on September 25, 2018 at 11:43 pm Contact Nick: nialvare@syr.edu | @nick_a_alvarez During an early season road trip, junior forward Severin Soerlie pressed his belly against the floor, put his hands at his sides and slithered between two airport gates. He was performing midfielder Hugo Delhommelle’s favorite task to dish out: Act like a snake for 20 seconds in public.The transfer broke character and shooed bystanders. A couple dozen feet away, his teammates beamed. It was all in good fun, anyway — Soerlie’s impersonation of a snake was a consequence after losing a card game. Syracuse head coach Ian McIntyre wasn’t surprised. He’s used to the “weirdness” his team exhibits off, and sometimes on, the pitch.“Some (impersonations) are quite funny. Some are …,” McIntyre paused, a smile cracking at the corners of his mouth, “… tough.”For years, SU players have completed tasks after losing competitions. After roster turnover, the embarrassing acts help familiarize the squad with each other, former and current Orange said. The tasks — acting like an animal or wearing a uniform at a public team dinner, among other things — are like a rite of passage.Laura Angle | Digital Design EditorAdvertisementThis is placeholder textSome Syracuse teams use dodgeball or Fortnite to bond. But card games, former defender Louis Cross said, are an SU men’s soccer “tradition,” specifically during road trips. This week, the Orange (3-3-1, 0-2-0 Atlantic Coast) preps for its second-longest road swing of the season. The team heads to Blacksburg, Virginia, for No. 21 Virginia Tech on Sept. 28 and Akron, Ohio, for the Zips three days later.“We started with a random punishment, and everyone liked it,” Delhommelle said. “… We play video games, but we also play cards. We’re like the old generation.”Before cards, “punishments” were dished out after rounds of Settlers of Catan, a board game in which players colonize a fictional island. Sergio Camargo, who transferred to Syracuse in 2016 for his senior season, bought Catan on Amazon. The team’s international athletes introduced poker and Go Fish shortly after. Swedish-born midfielder Jonathan Hagman said foreign players forced themselves to speak English during Catan and card games.Losing any game corresponded with a task. Once, a goaltender on the 2015 team wore his full kit, from cleats to gloves, during a team breakfast. Some underclassmen recited poems in front of the team. Others walked around like a Tyrannosaurus rex or flapped their arms like birds.“It’s very funny because it’s not that embarrassing,” Hagman said. “It’s a good group. We’d never force anyone to do anything they wouldn’t want to do.”When Camargo graduated, Catan stopped. But cards stuck in a new form.Delhommelle transferred from Lander University last season and brought a new card game with him. It has no name, midfielder Jan Breitenmoser said, but Syracuse calls it “21.” Delhommelle wasn’t sure how he learned the game, either. All that’s certain is the game’s central principle: There aren’t winners. Just one loser.Each player starts with seven cards in the first round. The game’s objective is to top another player’s card with a higher number or face card. After six rounds, the owner of the highest card remaining loses the round by as many points on their card. Once your score totals 21, you lose.Some, such as Hagman, pride themselves on how little they’ve lost. This season, SU brought out the “classic” punishments, along with a few new embarrassing acts. Assistant coach Matt Verni joined the game, lost and had to wear a shower cap during a pregame walkthrough. McIntyre and associate head coach Jukka Masalin have open invitations to join in but haven’t accepted.Before a flight earlier this year, Breitenmoser walked a fake runway in the airport. His teammates surrounded him and acted like photographers. Delhommelle recalled Breitenmoser’s strut as “impressive.”“When we’re away, we just don’t have much to do,” Delhommelle said. “It was very simple. We were looking for an easy game that everyone could play.” Commentslast_img read more