Farm Life Ecology: A Field & Table Intensive at Green Mountain College

first_imgOn a mid-summer day, the sun rises pretty early over Green Mountain College’s Cerridwen Farm. That’s good – because there’s a lot of work to be done. During GMC’s summer Farm Life Ecology Intensive May 18-August 14, students plow the fields, milk the cows, and plant the crops while taking classes and conducting research on topics like organic agriculture and farm systems.The 13 week-long, 12 credit summer intensive program allows students to manage all elements of the farm’s operation while learning first-hand about sustainable agriculture. Four subject areas comprise the program’s academic core including organic crop and animal management; management of farm systems; development of agricultural technologies with a focus on human and animal power; and the social and cultural importance of regional foods.Students will live in tents on the farm and prepare communal dinners made from produce they grow and harvest. In fact, the goal during the program is to eat only food that is grown or raised on the farm: no processing, no packaging – just fresh produce, eggs, honey, milk and meat.”The experience helps students understand how consumption is tied to production, allowing them to explore issues about energy, agriculture and sustainability,” said Cerridwen Farm Manager Dr. Kenneth Mulder, an experienced organic farmer who also holds a Ph.D. in ecological economics.In their course work, students investigate the theory and practice of traditional means of food preparation. Activities like bread baking, cheese making and canning and preserving food are explored from historical and cultural perspectives. Each week a different student team researches and prepares the communal meals.Students are expected to spend 1-2 hours per week developing a farm research project focused on the efficiency of human and animal powered technologies at Cerridwen Farm (GMC’s resident team of oxen, Lou and Bill, perform plowing and haying). They also devote seven hours per week to keep records on planting, germination, yield and management for a subset of the farm’s crops. And a farmer’s work is never done — students are expected to pitch in about 15 hours per week on farm chores.”The production of food is the most fundamental way in which we relate to the environment,” said Mulder. “While it may be hard to imagine surviving without ipods, cars, and air conditioning, it’s been done before. But we must produce food, and the ways in which we produce food can either exacerbate problems such as global warming and energy shortages or it can become part of the solution. Cerridwen Farm is a place where students can take an active role in the current food revolution that is transforming farming and how we view food.”More information on the intensive can be found at http://www.greenmtn.edu/farm_intensive.aspx(link is external)POULTNEY, Vt., March 17 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ –SOURCE Green Mountain College Students at Green Mountain College’s summer farm intensive learn to use draft animals in plowing and haying operations. The College is trying to determine if a family farm can operate profitably without use of fossil fuels. (PRNewsFoto/Green Mountain College)last_img read more

Santi Cazorla open to returning to Arsenal as a coach under Mikel Arteta

first_imgSanti Cazorla open to returning to Arsenal as a coach under Mikel Arteta Metro Sport ReporterWednesday 6 May 2020 4:37 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link18.7kShares Comment Mikel Arteta and Santi Cazorla spent four seasons together at Arsenal (Getty Images)‘I don’t know what my legacy is [at Arsenal],’ Cazorla told Vamos.‘You have to ask the fans, but I want to thank everyone. ‘I don’t know what I will do next, maybe a coach, maybe a sports director, but I would like to come back.’Cazorla also concedes that it is now ‘difficult’ for him to make Spain’s squad for their next major tournament after Euro 2020 was postponed for a year.‘It is a bit frustrating because I had the dream of going to the European Championship,’ said the midfielder. Santi Cazorla is open to another season with Villarreal (Getty Images)‘I am aware that I am already 35 years old and that it is more difficult every day to be in a group as good as the Spanish team.‘It has been delayed a year and I am aware that it is much more complicated for me.More: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man City‘I was enjoying it a lot and I hope to continue doing it, if the competition resumes, until the end of the season. ‘Next year I will decide and see what my body asks of me.’Follow Metro Sport across our social channels, on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. For more stories like this, check our sport page.center_img Advertisement Santi Cazorla is open to being part of Mikel Arteta’s coaching staff at Arsenal (Getty Images)Santi Cazorla says he would welcome the chance to return to Arsenal as part of Mikel Arteta’s coaching staff.The 35-year-old has been a key part of Villarreal’s midfield for the last two seasons and even earned a recall with Spain’s national team after a four-year absence last June.Cazorla spent six years at Arsenal and helped the club win two FA Cup trophies under Arsene Wenger.The midfielder also played alongside Mikel Arteta for four seasons at Arsenal and has already backed his former teammate to be a success after he replaced Unai Emery as manager in December.AdvertisementAdvertisementADVERTISEMENTBut Cazorla has now indicated that he would be open to working as a coach under Arteta once his playing career finishes. Advertisementlast_img read more

Oyawale, Yastrub step up in place of benched Witherspoon in SU’s 3-1 win over NC State

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Down 16-11 to North Carolina State in the second set, Amber Witherspoon and Jalissa Trotter jumped up with outstretched arms and blocked a Teni Sopitan kill onto the Wolfpack side of the net. The two turned around and yelled with smiles on their faces.As Witherspoon was subbed out, she high-fived each coach, and head coach Leonid Yelin motioned her towards him. With a surprised look on her face, Witherspoon sat down next to Yelin.The play before her block, a North Carolina State kill grazed off of her fingertips and bounced off Kendra Lukacs’ hands and out of bounds. Witherspoon threw up her hands in response to her teammates’ miss. It was one of the last things she did on the court Sunday.Midway through the second set, Witherspoon put her navy blue and orange Syracuse hoodie and remained on the bench after lacking energy and support early in Syracuse’s (12-6, 8-2 Atlantic Coast) 3-1 win over North Carolina State (10-10, 4-6) Sunday. Witherspoon’s move to the bench forced Christina Oyawale and Yuliia Yastrub to step up and fill the redshirt senior’s vacant role at the net.Yelin’s frustration wasn’t noticeable throughout the entire game.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textDuring warmups, Yelin wasn’t in his usual spot in the fifth chair from the right on the Syracuse bench. He walked around the court with a smile on his face. He laughed with freshman Elena Karakasi as she received sets from Dana Valelly, returned them to assistant coach Derryk Williams and spent time working with Ella Saada on her serve.Yelin resisted calling timeouts when the Wolfpack went on early runs. Yelin said the Wolfpack “played afraid” and made constant errors. The Orange had started the set with the energy and jumped on the Wolfpack 6-0.When SU took their foot off the gas in the second set, however, Yelin’s mood changed. And Witherspoon’s lack of energy and aggressiveness stood out to him most.“I said [to Amber] it’s gotta be lesson for you too,” Yelin said. “Because in some other matches, it would cost us the match, we would lose.”After the game, while the rest of her teammates unwrapped the legs and ankles and talked with fans on the court, Witherspoon met with Yelin and two of his assistants in the Alumni Conference Room in the Women’s Building for 18 minutes. While Yelin drank coffee and Witherspoon ate the fruit from her post-game meal, they exchanged comments about the benching and why it happened.“It wasn’t because Christina necessarily played better,” Yelin said he told Witherspoon after the game. “It was because you played well below our expectations of yourself. Way below the way you can play. Comments Published on October 21, 2018 at 7:21 pm Contact Andrew: arcrane@syr.edu | @CraneAndrew With Witherspoon out, the Orange asked of Oyawale and Yastrub to step up. After subbing in for Santita Ebangwese, who Witherspoon usually switches with, Oyawale immediately eyed and defended a Wolfpack kill. Her and Yastrub sent the ball to the ground on the North Carolina State side, giving the Orange a 2-0 lead.Two plays later, the two teamed up again, giving the Orange a 5-0 led and leading to “Let’s go Orange” chants from the fans. The play after that, Oyawale’s diving dig kept alive a play that ended in a Polina Shemanova kill.“Christina’s been a middle since she’s gotten here,” Ebangwese said. “It just fell right in, she’s used to doing this, she knew she needed to close blocks and be a defensive presence up there.”Yastrub led Syracuse with three aces and was third on the team with 16 total attacks. She helped SU’s net play click along with Oyawale, and the two were able to help the Orange rebound from losing the second set and tame Yelin’s disgust.The ability SU has to substitute out one of its senior leaders and still compete speaks to their depth, Trotter said.“I think it’s really tough when you have to make change or adjust,” Trotter said. “But I think that’s what makes you a good team, being able to make that adjustment and knowing your teammates, and being able to have that chemistry no matter who it is on the court.”last_img read more