Classic features delight in Woolloongabba home

first_img27 Lockhart St, Woolloongabba.“There was also an ugly cooker in the wall of the kitchen and when we pulled it out we found the chimney for the kitchen side of the double-sided fireplace.”Set on a 708sq m block, the home has a big front veranda and a spacious back deck. The traditional floorplan includes a lounge room, separate dining room and kitchen with sitting area. 27 Lockhart St, Woolloongabba.“It has leadlight windows, 14ft ceilings and, being a quintessential Queenslander, big verandas, north-facing (orientation) and lots of good breezes.More from newsCrowd expected as mega estate goes under the hammer7 Aug 2020Hard work, resourcefulness and $17k bring old Ipswich home back to life20 Apr 2020“When we moved in there were some really bad carpets, which we pulled up and there were magnificent timber floors underneath. 27 Lockhart St, Woolloongabba.The kitchen has french doors opening to the deck, white cabinetry, stainless steel appliances and the original brick fireplace, while on the opposite side of the wall there is an ornate fireplace in the dining room. The home at 27 Lockhart St, Woolloongabba.A century-old Queenslander with beautiful character features, including fireplaces and timber floors, is going under the hammer in Woolloongabba. Owners Bruce and Anne Redman have called the classic beauty at 27 Lockhart St home for 23 years. “We liked that it was original when we got it and we tried to maintain that,” Mr Redman said. “The original features are what make it. It’s been there for over 100 years and it was made to last. 27 Lockhart St, Woolloongabba.The master bedroom has built-in robes and an ensuite, and there are three more bedroom plus a study, family bathroom and laundry. Mr Redman said the home was in the established neighbourhood of Gabba Hill. “It’s a very friendly little area. Everyone managed to keep it a good little secret for a long time,” he said.last_img read more

George Taliaferro’s Life

first_imgGeorge Taliaferro was the first black athlete drafted by the NFL.  He was an All-American running back at Indiana University.  While he was at IU in the 1940’s, he decided it was time to end the segregation that was present in a Bloomington movie theater.  He quietly paid his admission, went to the balcony, pulled out a screw driver, and removed the “colored only” sign from the wall.  He then proceeded to leave the theater with the sign under his coat.Not only was George a pioneer, his wife was the first African-American judge in the state of Indiana.  In later years George recruited black athletes for Bob Knight.  He also opened the first Boys & Girls Club in Bloomington.  Today George’s best friend is an 8-year old girl who has had all of her major organs replaced.  What a mark this amazing man has left in the state of Indiana.last_img read more