Former Syracuse forward Matthew Moyer looks back on Syracuse, ahead at Vanderbilt

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ On Nov. 15, Vanderbilt head coach Bryce Drew called Matthew Moyer into his office. “You’re suiting up,” Drew said. Moyer had transferred from Syracuse after playing one season, and he expected to sit out this season due to NCAA transfer rules. But two games into the season, Drew told him the NCAA had granted him a waiver to play for the Commodores right away. The former SU forward was stunned.“I was cleared out of nowhere, man,” Moyer said. “I had no idea what was going to happen. It was emotional. I haven’t had the easiest college career, not the most pleasant beginning.”In his lone season at Syracuse, Moyer averaged 3.2 points and 3.4 rebounds per game. After he announced his decision to transfer on March. 26, 2018, his mother, Annette, said her phone was “ringing off the hook,” with high-major Division I programs interested in offering Moyer a scholarship. The schools included Florida, Ohio State, Kansas State, Texas and Vanderbilt. He chose the Commodores, which he felt gave him a quality education and more playing time as he hoped to complete his MBA and ascend into an NBA hopeful.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textColumn ChartInfogramMoyer didn’t get the playing time he had planned at SU and that drove him to find a new program. He said his offense was limited to inside the arch. “We play man (at Vandy), and they want me to take outside shots,” Moyer said. “At Syracuse, I wasn’t really allowed to take outside shots.” He averaged 16.8 minutes per game for SU. He didn’t want to leave the S.I. Newhouse School of Communications, but he’ll continue studying communications and business at Vanderbilt.Moyer didn’t visit campus before committing. He trusted Drew after an in-home visit and a handful of phone calls. He was confident he’d made the right choice.“I wasn’t chilling in the offseason, but I wasn’t expected to play this year,” Moyer said. “Then it hit me. This is a completely different system.”He said he’ll miss playing for a Hall of Fame coach, Jim Boeheim, and for assistant coach Gerry McNamara — the man who “found me in Ohio” and knocked on Moyer’s door. Moyer said he misses his former teammates, some of whom he still plays video games with. He grew closest with junior shooting guard Tyus Battle, his old roommate. “Tyus Battle is one of my best friends,” Moyer said. “I got to be around some great players. Coach Boeheim and coach Red (Adrian Autry) and G-Mac are legends.”Alexandra Moreo | Senior Staff PhotographerBut Moyer struggled playing for SU. He redshirted his first year. Last season, as a redshirt freshman, the 6-foot-8 forward started the first 20 games, but lost his job when he suffered a high-ankle sprain in a Jan. 24 win against Boston College. Marek Dolezaj began to play well and took the starting forward position. Moyer did not start again in his SU career and played sparingly the rest of the season, oftentimes getting chastised by Boeheim from the sidelines. Following Syracuse’s Sweet 16 run that ended in Omaha, Nebraska, Moyer met with Boeheim, who, according to Moyer, told the former four-star recruit: “Do whatever’s best for you.” Now, Moyer’s focused on starting anew. He lives by himself in a dorm on campus. He’s learning to play man-to-man for the first time in three years while developing his outside shot. Through 17 games, he’s averaging 15.8 minutes per game — on par with his average at Syracuse — 4.6 points and 3.2 rebounds per contest for the Commodores, who are 9-10 overall and 0-6 in the Southeastern Conference. When Moyer reflected on his two years in central New York, he thought about fulfilling his dream of playing for SU. He thought about Battle. He said he doesn’t miss the snow, and he leaves a singular message for Syracuse and its fanbase“I’ll always be an Orangeman,” Moyer said. “It was a blessed time. I got to play for the program I wanted to play for in high school. It was a dream come true.” Published on January 28, 2019 at 10:31 pm Contact Matthew: mguti100@syr.edu | @MatthewGut21center_img Commentslast_img read more

Korean War veterans form own organization

first_imgSome 60 years after fighting the Korean War, local veterans have formed an organization that specifically recognizes the conflict and their service in it.“It’s been a long time coming,” said Harold Olson, the first vice commander of the newly formed chapter.“We’re not looking for recognition,” Olson said, but the chapter can provide camaraderie for veterans. The chapter also is a way for vets to connect with people who know about accessing veterans’ benefits.“We’ve always thought that it was the forgotten war,” Olson said of the conflict, which started on started June 25, 1950; hostilities ended July 27, 1953.Even when troops were in the middle of the war, they often felt overlooked with a supply system did not match the challenge, Olson said.“Clothing was inadequate,” said Olson, a Navy veteran who was attached to a Marine unit. “I don’t think I had a warm moment.”The national Korean War Veterans Association includes a history link showing how the U.S. Army scrambled to gear up for war. One “battalion was so short of tanks that those on concrete pedestals as monuments around Fort Knox had to be taken down and made operational by installing engines, transmissions, and other equipment.”The local organization’s first meeting drew more than 100 veterans, Olson said. The group organized as the Richard L. Quatier Chapter Korean War Veterans Association of Southwest Washington.last_img read more

Costa Rica appeal of Patton not guilty verdict would have little to

first_imgHours after a three-judge panel in Pérez Zeledón found U.S. expat Ann Patton not guilty on Monday of murdering her husband, the prosecutor said the government would appeal the verdict — for the second time. If the prosecutor’s appeal were to be successful it would lead to Patton’s fourth trial for the same crime.“This isn’t over,” Prosecutor Edgar Ramírez told The Tico Times.But some criminal lawyers doubt that Patton will face another trial in the 2010 shooting death of her late husband John Bender.A 2014 ruling by the Constitutional Chamber of the Supreme Court, or Sala IV, precludes another trial for Patton now that she has been found not guilty twice by different courts, according to criminal lawyer and University of Costa Rica law professor Javier Llobet. Costa Rica does not have a prohibition against double jeopardy, but Llobet said there are limits on the state’s ability to continue appealing a case.A 2006 reform to the criminal code included an article prohibiting the Prosecutor’s Office from appealing a second acquittal. In 2010, a law was passed that struck that article from the criminal code. But in 2014, Sala IV ruled that the 2010 law was unconstitutional.Sala IV then reconstituted the 2006 language limiting prosecutor appeals. Sala IV justices said there should be a “reasonable limit” on the state’s ability to continue pursuing appeals with which it does not agree. Without these limits, the justices wrote, defendants could not be guaranteed their right to a speedy trial and would be left in perpetual legal limbo that also could become disproportionately expensive.“The state cannot act as a persecutor ad infinitum,” the justices wrote in their resolution.Former prosecutor Steven Ferris — who is a Tico Times board member — said that Ramírez’s pledge to appeal the ruling in the Patton case before the full verdict had been released was a “bold” move. After three trials and two acquittals, Ferris said a fourth was not possible.Ramírez said his office would review the full sentence — expected on Sept. 14 — before crafting the government’s appeal. He said the Prosecutor’s Office would not be satisfied “until justice is done for John Bender’s death.”The initial verdict released Monday afternoon by the court in Pérez Zeledón found Patton not guilty of murder charges in the 2010 shooting death of her husband. Patton has always maintained her innocence and said that her husband, John Felix Bender, shot himself.Patton told The Tico Times after her acquittal Monday that she hoped “the verdict will be strong enough so that an appeal cannot be written or won’t be accepted and that it can end now and John can finally rest.” Facebook Comments Related posts:U.S. expat Ann Patton to face fourth murder trial Ann Patton on her new trial: ‘It is my opportunity to finally, hopefully, get true justice’ US expat Ann Patton faces third murder trial in Costa Rica  Ann Patton in new battle with Costa Rican government over $7 million in seized gemslast_img read more